In Parts 1 and 2, we looked at the different types of learning story, introduced the concept of Accelerative Learning, explored the history of AL, how it is defined and the key principles for designing an AL program.

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accelerative learning

In Parts 1 and 2, we looked at the different types of learning story, introduced the concept of Accelerative Learning, explored the history of AL,  how it is defined and the key principles for designing an AL program.  In Part 3, we look at the AL cycle, how AL shows up in the classroom and the delivery approach, content design and benefits of an AL program.

The Accelerative Learning Cycle

When designing and facilitating an AL program, the AL cycle provides a broad but flexible template that helps ensure that all the principles of AL are met.   The Accelerative Learning Cycle consists of the following five phases (Kinnard 2007):

  1. Learner Preparation Phase:

This involves prework designed to engage the learners minds and hearts before they actually arrive at the session.  It prepares the learners for what is to come and makes it real. 

  1. Connection Phase:

This involves consciously designing the program to allows participants to connect with the content at many different levels: intellectual, emotional and at times physically. It is the phase where the facilitator makes the most “boring” of subjects come to life.

  1. Creative Presentation Phase:

In this phase new material is presented, or learners are allowed to discover and develop new information in interactive, creative and memorable ways using mixed media and different structured learning methods. 

  1. Activation Phase:

Here, learners begin to use the new information in a controlled and structured way using games and small group or whole group activities that are fun and meaningful. At this point, the facilitator is handing off the baton as learners’ competency increases. 

  1. Integration Phase:

This phase brings the session to a close.  It allows learners to transfer the learning to their lives through personal and group reflection and feedback and the development of ongoing learning commitments.

How does AL show up in the classroom?

 

Classroom environment: 

Creating the right classroom environment is crucial to an effective AL training session.  The classroom setting needs to be colourful, comfortable and naturally stimulating. It needs to feel like fun; designed to help the participants relax and eliminate whatever uncertainty, stress or learning barriers they may come in with.  The setting needs to be collaborative and mutually supportive. 

This can be created by careful room set up, using cabaret style layout, choosing a room with natural light, using colourful table throw overs, providing table toys, using bright image-based content and peripheral posters and the skilful use of music. 

 

Delivery approach:  

The delivery approach needs to be learner-centred as opposed to teacher-centred.  The AL facilitator needs to be skilled in:

  • Using open-ended questions to create and hold discussion
  • Active listening to ensure all participants are engaged and heard
  • Attending to their own nonverbal communication to energise the session and support the learning process
  • Observing the participants, inferring what they are up to and taking action to keep the learning on track.

 

Content and material: 

Content needs to be designed to appeal to all three of the learning modalities; audio, visual and kinaesthetic.  This requires a skilful blend of speaking, written content, posters and images, video, music, and activities involving group discussion, games and physical engagement.  Time also needs to be built into the session for contemplation and reflection to allow the learning to be processed and assimilated by the participants. 

 

What are the benefits of Accelerative Learning?

AL is effective because it actively engages learners in driving their own learning.  People leave an AL training session having had fun, feeling engaged and excited and ready to implement what they have learned in the workplace.  It is a total system for speeding and enhancing both the design and learning processes that provides a consistently high level of return on any training investment. 

In the words of Gary Schornack, “Our challenge as instructors is to help the student learn more faster, easier, with greater retention. Accelerated learning is the method, and it is fun for both the instructor and student. We can help our students become world-class experts and gurus in our field if we are willing to change our thinking on how our students learn.”(Schornack 1996)

If you’d like to apply Accelerative Learning to training events at your own organisation, talk to us at Kaleidoskope, today.

 

Sources and References:

Bathla, Som (2018). “The Magic of Accelerated Learning: Discover Strategies for Effective Learning, Improved Memorisation, Sharpened Focus and Become an Expert in Any Skill You Want”

Conners, K (2018). “Accelerated Learning: Advanced Strategies for Improved Memorisation, Effective Listening and Increased Productivity”

Kinnard, Karen (2007). “The Accelerated Learning Cycle: Are You Ready to Learn? Am I Ready to Lead?”

http://www.austincc.edu/mparker/talks/uscots07/al/overview_accel_learning.pdf

Labiosa, Libyan; Atkisson, Alan (1996). “Accelerated Learning – The value of playing games, singing songs, listening to stories and how learning is improved by the power of suggestion” www.realeducation4al.com/Articles/Article_-_AL_in_Context_Interview.pdf

Labiosa, Libyan; Randig, Sinéad; Cassone, Philip (2018). “The Accelerative Learning Road Less Travelled” www.realeducation4al.com/Articles/Article_-_AL_Road_Less_Traveled.pdf

McKeon, Kevin J. (1995). “What is this Thing Called Accelerated Leaming?” Training and Development Journal, Vol. 49, No. 6.

Nitsche, Pearl (2017). “Nonverbal Classroom Management – Group Strategies that Work” http://www.realeducation4al.com/Articles/Article_-_Nonverbal_Classroom_Management.pdf  

Schornack, Gary (1996). “Accelerated Learning Techniques for Adults – An Instructional Design Concept for the Next Decade”  https://commons.erau.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1045&context=bollinger-rosado 

Smith, Alastair (2016). “Accelerated Learning in Practice”

Wilkens, Jonathan (2017). “Accelerated Learning: Accelerated Learning Techniques, Memory Techniques, Improve Your Memory, Learn More in Less”

Zemke, Ron (1995). “Accelerated Leaming: madness with a method,” Training and Development Journal, Vol. 32, No. l 0

Additional Information:

(CAL 2019). The Center for Accelerated Learning – www.alcenter.com/about-us/about-a-l 

(ICAL 2019). International Centre for Accelerative Learning (ICAL) – www.realeducation4al.com

(Administrate 2018). Administrate Group – https://www.getadministrate.com/blog/how-the-world-spent-359bn-on-training/

(Watson 2013).  CCW Consulting LLC – https://businessgateways.com/ccwconsultingllc

Start giving your staff LEARNING THAT STICKS

In Part 1, we looked at the different types of learning story and introduced the concept of Accelerative Learning. In this post we explore the history of Accelerative Learning, how it is defined and the key principles of designing an AL program.

My Blog

Corporate Training Blog Subscribe

accelerative learning

In Part 1, we looked at the different types of learning story and introduced the concept of Accelerative Learning.  In this post we explore the history of Accelerative Learning,  how it is defined and the key principles of designing an AL program.

Where did Accelerative Learning come from?

The father of AL is the Bulgarian psychiatrist Dr. Georgi Lozanov.  Dr Lazanov’s initial work in the 1960s was called “Suggestopedia”.  He discovered that creating a positive and supportive learning environment that puts people into a state of “relaxed alertness” had a significant impact on learning outcomes (Smith 2006). 

Dr. Lazonov’s work was built upon by Dr. Evelyn Gateva with Curriculum and Instructional Design; Libyan Labiosa Cassone who coined the term Accelerative Learning; Professor Stephen Krashen with Language Acquisition; Dr. Roger Sperry’s brain research (awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine in 1981); Professor Howard Gardner with Multiple Intelligences; Professor Marian Diamond and the Enriched Learning Environment and Professor James Asher with Total Physical Response. 

Other contributions over the years have included Tony Buzan’s work on memory, Brandler and Grinder’s work on Neuro-Linguistic Programming, Czikszentmihalyi’s work on human fulfilment and flow among many others.  

It is a long lineage of research bringing AL to the powerful multi-method, multimedia learning technique that it is today.   

How is Accelerative Learning defined?

Accelerative Learning, also known as Accelerated Learning in the corporate world, is defined as “a method of instruction that provides an atmosphere where students are able to absorb and retain concepts by overcoming traditional barriers of learning” (McKeon 1995).   It is a combination of neuroscience, cognitive psychology and instructional design which involves training facilitators, creating content and developing material (Labiosa 1996).

What are the principles of Accelerative Learning?

So how does it work?  AL training is designed and delivered around a number of key principles which can be summarised as follows (CAL 2019):

1.    Learning involves the whole of the body and mind

The learning approach is designed to engage the learner’s body, senses, creativity and emotions and not just the “head” centred rational and verbal consciousness.

2.    Learning is created and not consumed

The learner actively creates knowledge as opposed to absorbing it.  This is not a passive process of sitting and listening but an active process of integrating new knowledge and skills into the learners’existing structure of self.  

3.    Collaboration facilitates learning

Research indicates that creating competition between learners slows learning down whereas creating collaboration speeds it up.  People often learn more by interacting with peers than by any other means. Creating collaboration is a central tenet of any AL program.

4.    Learning takes place on many different levels simultaneously

The brain does not work sequentially, in a linear way but is a parallel processor which thrives when challenged to do many things at once.  AL engages people on many different levels simultaneously; using all the receptors, senses and pathway it can to bring the learning into the person’s full brain and body system. 

5.    Learning comes from doing and feedback 

Information learned in isolation, without a frame of reference, is quickly forgotten.  By ensuring Immediate practical application of knowledge, or learning by doing, AL provides the brain with the context and frame of reference for long term retention.  AL also provides time for immersion, feedback, reflection and re-immersion to lock learning in. 

6.    Positive emotions greatly improve learning

Learning that is associated with negative emotional states such as stress, frustration, discomfort or boredom is quickly left behind.  By actively creating feelings of relaxation, fun and engagement, AL creates a higher quality of learning and retention. 

7.    The image brain absorbs information instantly and automatically

The human nervous system is a far more powerful image processor than it is a word processor.  Images are easier to process, understand and retain than verbal abstractions.  By translating verbal content into images of all kinds, AL makes training content faster to learn and easier to remember.

In Part 3, we look at the AL Cycle for success, how AL shows up in the classroom and the delivery approach, content and benefits of an AL program. If you have questions about anything you’ve read so far, ask us here

Sources and References:

Bathla, Som (2018). “The Magic of Accelerated Learning: Discover Strategies for Effective Learning, Improved Memorisation, Sharpened Focus and Become an Expert in Any Skill You Want” 

Conners, K (2018). “Accelerated Learning: Advanced Strategies for Improved Memorisation, Effective Listening and Increased Productivity”

Kinnard, Karen (2007). “The Accelerated Learning Cycle: Are You Ready to Learn? Am I Ready to Lead?”

http://www.austincc.edu/mparker/talks/uscots07/al/overview_accel_learning.pdf

Labiosa, Libyan; Atkisson, Alan (1996). “Accelerated Learning – The value of playing games, singing songs, listening to stories and how learning is improved by the power of suggestion” www.realeducation4al.com/Articles/Article_-_AL_in_Context_Interview.pdf

Labiosa, Libyan; Randig, Sinéad; Cassone, Philip (2018). “The Accelerative Learning Road Less Travelled” www.realeducation4al.com/Articles/Article_-_AL_Road_Less_Traveled.pdf

McKeon, Kevin J. (1995). “What is this Thing Called Accelerated Leaming?” Training and Development Journal, Vol. 49, No. 6.

Nitsche, Pearl (2017). “Nonverbal Classroom Management – Group Strategies that Work” http://www.realeducation4al.com/Articles/Article_-_Nonverbal_Classroom_Management.pdf  

Schornack, Gary (1996). “Accelerated Learning Techniques for Adults – An Instructional Design Concept for the Next Decade”  https://commons.erau.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1045&context=bollinger-rosado 

Smith, Alastair (2016). “Accelerated Learning in Practice”

Wilkens, Jonathan (2017). “Accelerated Learning: Accelerated Learning Techniques, Memory Techniques, Improve Your Memory, Learn More in Less”

Zemke, Ron (1995). “Accelerated Leaming: madness with a method,” Training and Development Journal, Vol. 32, No. l 0

Additional Information:

(CAL 2019). The Center for Accelerated Learning – www.alcenter.com/about-us/about-a-l 

(ICAL 2019). International Centre for Accelerative Learning (ICAL) – www.realeducation4al.com

(Administrate 2018). Administrate Group – https://www.getadministrate.com/blog/how-the-world-spent-359bn-on-training/

(Watson 2013).  CCW Consulting LLC – https://businessgateways.com/ccwconsultingllc

 

Start giving your staff LEARNING THAT STICKS

This blog post is the first of three posts on Accelerative Learning (AL) theory. In Part 1, we look at the different types of learning story and introduce the concept of Accelerative Learning.

My Blog

Corporate Training Blog Subscribe

 

accelerative learning

This blog post is the first of three posts on Accelerative Learning (AL) theory.  In Part 1, we look at the different types of learning story and introduce the concept of Accelerative Learning.   

The learning story (Part 1) 

Picture the scene.  A presenter is at the front of the room, 40 minutes into a session about ethical compliance obligations, literally talking to his 35th PowerPoint slide.  There are a few people at the front fighting to stay awake, most are on their phone or tablet and one or two at the back are literally nodding off.  The presenter speeds up in a bid to get it over and done with.  At the end of the session, there is muted applause and a collective rush for the door.  The company can tick the box on ethics training – but did anyone really learn anything? A day or two later and most of the participants probably won’t even remember having been in the room and will determine to avoid the next session like the plague. 

Unfortunately, this scene is playing out in corporate meeting rooms every day all over the world and it begs the question, what’s the point?  If people are leaving training sessions, going back to work and continuing to do the same things in the same way as they did before they went in, then it really is just a waste of time and money.  It is estimated that businesses worldwide spend $350B each year on training (Administrate 2018), not including the cost of participant hours.  What percentage of that spend is really having a material impact?

It doesn’t have to be like this. There are tried and tested learning approaches that can and do increase learning effectiveness, ensuring a significant return on a company’s investment in training.  One particularly powerful, well researched and documented approach is Accelerative Learning (AL).  

What is Accelerative Learning (AL)?

Accelerative Learning (AL) has been described as the most advanced teaching and learning method in use today (CAL 2019).  It is a powerful approach based on over 50 years of brain research, designed to enhances both the training design and the learning process.  When applied correctly, it has been proven to significantly increase learning effectiveness whilst saving time and money.  

Based on the way that human beings naturally learn, AL taps into our innate potential for learning in a way that traditional learning methods cannot.  It does this by fully involving the participant in their own learning experience using physical activity, creativity, colour, images, music and the whole training environment. 

AL is described as activity-based and learner-driven (ABLeD), where learners discover and create their own knowledge through meaningful activities and authentic experience.  The trainer becomes “the guide on the side” as opposed to “the sage on the stage” (CWW 2013), facilitating the learning process and delivering content only to supplement the learners’ own process of discovery and creation. 

The learning story (Part 2)

Picture the scene with the application of AL.  Three groups of participants have been busily discussing a scenario where a company employee is facing an ethical dilemma that looks like it could be in breach of the law.  They’ve studied the legislation, figured out the relevant clauses, prepared their feedback and are about to present.  The brief requires the first group to feedback with a poster and no words; the second group has to create a song; and the third group has to act it out.  The room is tense with excited anticipation…

They leave the room not only having actively studied the content but also having seen, heard and felt it through the media of three different learning modalities.  In the process, they have built relationships, broken down barriers, had a lot of fun and are ready to take what they have learned back to the workplace and sign up for the next session.

In Part 2, we explore the history of Accelerative Learning,  how it is defined and the key principles for designing an AL program. If youhave questions about anything you’ve read so far, ask us here.

 

Sources and References:

Bathla, Som (2018). “The Magic of Accelerated Learning: Discover Strategies for Effective Learning, Improved Memorisation, Sharpened Focus and Become an Expert in Any Skill You Want”

Conners, K (2018). “Accelerated Learning: Advanced Strategies for Improved Memorisation, Effective Listening and Increased Productivity”

Kinnard, Karen (2007). “The Accelerated Learning Cycle: Are You Ready to Learn? Am I Ready to Lead?”

http://www.austincc.edu/mparker/talks/uscots07/al/overview_accel_learning.pdf

Labiosa, Libyan; Atkisson, Alan (1996). “Accelerated Learning – The value of playing games, singing songs, listening to stories and how learning is improved by the power of suggestion” www.realeducation4al.com/Articles/Article_-_AL_in_Context_Interview.pdf

Labiosa, Libyan; Randig, Sinéad; Cassone, Philip (2018). “The Accelerative Learning Road Less Travelled” www.realeducation4al.com/Articles/Article_-_AL_Road_Less_Traveled.pdf

McKeon, Kevin J. (1995). “What is this Thing Called Accelerated Leaming?” Training and Development Journal, Vol. 49, No. 6.

Nitsche, Pearl (2017). “Nonverbal Classroom Management – Group Strategies that Work” http://www.realeducation4al.com/Articles/Article_-_Nonverbal_Classroom_Management.pdf  

Schornack, Gary (1996). “Accelerated Learning Techniques for Adults – An Instructional Design Concept for the Next Decade”  https://commons.erau.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1045&context=bollinger-rosado 

Smith, Alastair (2016). “Accelerated Learning in Practice”

Wilkens, Jonathan (2017). “Accelerated Learning: Accelerated Learning Techniques, Memory Techniques, Improve Your Memory, Learn More in Less”

Zemke, Ron (1995). “Accelerated Leaming: madness with a method,” Training and Development Journal, Vol. 32, No. l 0

Additional Information:

(CAL 2019). The Center for Accelerated Learning – www.alcenter.com/about-us/about-a-l 

(ICAL 2019). International Centre for Accelerative Learning (ICAL) – www.realeducation4al.com

(Administrate 2018). Administrate Group – https://www.getadministrate.com/blog/how-the-world-spent-359bn-on-training/

(Watson 2013).  CCW Consulting LLC – https://businessgateways.com/ccwconsultingllc

Start giving your staff LEARNING THAT STICKS